Art Center Start Nears

Centerville facility will serve as gallery, teaching studio

BYLINE: Katherine Ullmer DAYTON DAILY NEWS
DATE: May 3, 2001
PUBLICATION: Dayton Daily News (OH)
EDITION: CENTERVILLE/BELLBROOK
SECTION: NEIGHBORS
PAGE: 1

CENTERVILLE -

Construction should soon be under way on a new creative arts center being built by art gallery owner Kee Hee Lee on Far Hills Avenue in Centerville.
The two-story, 5,850-square-foot colonial-style brick building was originally scheduled to be done by now, but the plans, approved last November, stalled over building code issues. In the meantime, the owner changed builders and the exterior design, said Ryan Shrimplin, assistant Centerville city planner.
Shrimplin said this meant that the site plan had to come back before the Centerville Planning Commission for a minor amendment to the special approval originally granted in November.
The center, which will serve as an art gallery and studio for teaching art as well as language arts and math, is to be constructed on a half-acre lot just south of Kee Hee's existing gallery, the Wind Fine Art Gallery and School of Fine Art, 7266 Far Hills Ave.
Jeff Vaughan, of J&E Custom Homes who contracted to build the new structure, represented Kee Hee at the April 24 planning commission meeting.
Vaughan said he's sure his client would be willing to go along with the commission's conditions that the building's large front windows be divided in two so they will have a more vertical appearance.
Even though Kee Hee wanted the large windows, she is anxious to get started with construction, Vaughan said.
A large window opening over the entrance is also to be split into three sections to give the window a more vertical look, he said.
The commission members said they wanted the windows to have a more vertical look so they would be compatible with windows in other nearby buildings.
The new design also calls for a pediment-style design rather than the original widow's walk over the front entrance and gets rid of the two sets of columns on either side of the entrance, Shrimplin said.
The roof pitch also was increased, making the height of the building the maximum height allowed in the office-service zoning district, 35 feet. This is about a five-foot increase from the original plans, Shrimplin said.

Copyright, 2001, Cox Ohio Publishing. All rights reserved.